Two Treatises of Civil Government cover

Two Treatises of Civil Government

John Locke (1632-1704)

00:00(1/34) 00 – Preface00:00
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1. 00 – Preface
2. 01 – Book I, Chapter 01
3. 02 – Book I, Chapter 02: Of Paternal and Regal Power
4. 03 – Book I, Chapter 03: Of Adam’s Title to Sovereignty by Creation
5. 04 – Book I, Chapter 04: Of Adam’s Title to Sovereignty By Donation, Gen. I. 28
6. 05 – Book I, Chapter 05: Of Adam’s Title to Sovereignty By the Subjection of Eve
7. 06 – Book I, Chapter 06: Of Adam’s Title to Sovereignty By Fatherhood
8. 07 – Book I, Chapter 07: Of Fatherhood and Property Considered Together As Fountains of Sovereignty
9. 08 – Book I, Chapter 08: Of the Conveyance of Adam’s Sovereign Monarchical Power
10. 09 – Book I, Chapter 09: Of Monarchy, By Inheritance from Adam
11. 10 – Book I, Chapter 10: Of the Heir to Adam’s Monarchical Power
12. 11 – Book I, Chapter 11: Who Heir? part 1
13. 12 – Book I, Chapter 11: Who Heir? part 2
14. 13 – Book I, Chapter 11: Who Heir? part 3
15. 14 – Book I, Chapter 11: Who Heir? part 4
16. 15 – Book II, Chapter 01
17. 16 – Book II, Chapter 02: Of the State of Nature
18. 17 – Book II, Chapter 03: Of the State of War
19. 18 – Book II, Chapter 04: Of Slavery
20. 19 – Book II, Chapter 05: Of Property
21. 20 – Book II, Chapter 06: Of Paternal Power
22. 21 – Book II, Chapter 07: Of Political or Civil Society
23. 22 – Book II, Chapter 08: Of the Beginning of Political Societies
24. 23 – Book II, Chapter 09: Of the Ends of Political Society and Government
25. 24 – Book II, Chapter 10: Of the Forms of a Common-wealth
26. 25 – Book II, Chapter 11: Of the Extent of the Legislative Power
27. 26 – Book II, Chapter 12: Of the Legislative, Executive, and Federative Power of the Common-wealth
28. 27 – Book II, Chapter 13: Of the Subordination of the Powers of the Common-wealth
29. 28 – Book II, Chapter 14: Of Prerogative
30. 29 – Book II, Chapter 15: Of Paternal, Political, and Despotical Power, Considered Together
31. 30 – Book II, Chapter 16: Of Conquest
32. 31 – Book II, Chapter 17: Of Usurpation
33. 32 – Book II, Chapter 18: Of Tyranny
34. 33 – Book II, Chapter 19: Of the Dissolution of Government

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Summary

The Two Treatises of Civil Government is a work of political philosophy published anonymously in 1689 by John Locke. The First Treatise is an extended attack on Sir Robert Filmer’s Patriarcha, which argued for a divinely-ordained, hereditary, absolute monarchy. The more influential Second Treatise outlines a theory of civil society based on natural rights and contract theory. Locke begins by describing the “state of nature,” and goes on to explain the hypothetical rise of property and civilization, asserting that the only legitimate governments are those which have the consent of the people.Locke’s ideas heavily influenced both the American and French Revolutions. His notions of people’s rights and the role of civil government provided strong support for the intellectual movements of both revolutions.