Tremendous Trifles cover

Tremendous Trifles

G. K. Chesterton

1. 01 – Preface & Chapter 01
2. 02 – Chapter 02 – A Piece of Chalk
3. 03 – Chapter 03 – The Secret of a Train
4. 04 – Chapter 04 – The Perfect Game
5. 05 – Chapter 05 – The Extraordinary Cabman
6. 06 – Chapter 06 – An Accident
7. 07 – Chapter 07 – The Advantage of Having One Leg
8. 08 – Chapter 08 – The End of the World
9. 09 – Chapter 09 – In the Place de la Bastille
10. 10 – Chapter 10 – On Lying in Bed
11. 11 – Chapter 11 – The Twelve Men
12. 12 – Chapter 12 – The Wind and the Trees
13. 13 – Chapter 13 – The Dickensian
14. 14 – Chapter 14 – In Topsy-Turvy Land
15. 15 – Chapter 15 – What I Found in My Pocket
16. 16 – Chapter 16 – The Dragon’s Grandmother
17. 17 – Chapter 17 – The Red Angel
18. 18 – Chapter 18 – The Tower
19. 19 – Chapter 19 – How I Met the President
20. 20 – Chapter 20 – The Giant
21. 21 – Chapter 21 – The Great Man
22. 22 – Chapter 22 – The Orthodox Barber
23. 23 – Chapter 23 – The Toy Theatre
24. 24 – Chapter 24 – The Tragedy of Twopence
25. 25 – Chapter 25 – A Cab Ride Across Country
26. 26 – Chapter 26 – The Two Noises
27. 27 – Chapter 27 – Some Policemen and a Moral
28. 28 – Chap;ter 28 – The Lion
29. 29 – Chapter 29 – Humanity: An Interlude
30. 30 – Chapter 30 – The Little Birds Who Won’t Sing
31. 31 – Chapter 31 – The Riddle of the Ivy
32. 32 – Chapter 32 – The Travellers in State
33. 33 – Chapter 33 – The Prehistoric Railway Station
34. 34 – Chapter 34 – The Diabolist
35. 35 – Chapter 35 – A Glimpse of My Country
36. 36 – Chapter 36 – A Somewhat Improbable Story
37. 37 – Chapter 37 – The Shop of Ghosts
38. 38 – Chapter 38 – The Ballade of a Strange Town
39. 39 – Chapter 39 – The Mystery of a Pageant

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Summary

“None of us think enough of these things on which the eye rests. But don’t let us let the eye rest. Why should the eye be so lazy? Let us exercise the eye until it learns to see startling facts that run across the landscape as plain as a painted fence. Let us be ocular athletes. Let us learn to write essays on a stray cat or a coloured cloud. I have attempted some such thing in what follows; but anyone else may do it better, if anyone else will only try. ” (Gilbert Keith Chesterton)