Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government, Volume 2 cover

Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government, Volume 2

Jefferson Davis (1808-1889)

1. Part 4, Chapter 15
2. Part 4, Chapter 16
3. Part 4, Chapter 17
4. Part 4, Chapter 18
5. Part 4, Chapter 19
6. Part 4, Chapter 20
7. Part 4, Chapter 21
8. Part 4, Chapter 22
9. Part 4, Chapter 23
10. Part 4, Chapter 24
11. Part 4, Chapter 25
12. Part 4, Chapter 26
13. Part 4, Chapter 27
14. Part 4, Chapter 28
15. Part 4, Chapter 29
16. Part 4, Chapter 30
17. Part 4, Chapter 31
18. Part 4, Chapter 32
19. Part 4, Chapter 33
20. Part 4, Chapter 34
21. Part 4, Chapter 35
22. Part 4, Chapter 36
23. Part 4, Chapter 37
24. Part 4, Chapter 38
25. Part 4, Chapter 39a
26. Part 4, Chapter 39b
27. Part 4, Chapter 39c
28. Part 4, Chapter 40
29. Part 4, Chapter 41
30. Part 4, Chapter 42
31. Part 4, Chapter 43
32. Part 4, Chapter 44a
33. Part 4, Chapter 44b
34. Part 4, Chapter 45
35. Part 4, Chapter 46
36. Part 4, Chapter 47
37. Part 4, Chapter 48a
38. Part 4, Chapter 48b
39. Part 4, Chapter 49a
40. Part 4, Chapter 49b
41. Part 4, Chapter 50
42. Part 4, Chapter 51
43. Part 4, Chapter 52a
44. Part 4, Chapter 52b
45. Part 4, Chapter 53
46. Part 4, Chapter 54a
47. Part 4, Chapter 54b
48. Part 4, Chapter 55
49. Part 4, Chapter 56
50. Part 4, Chapter 57a
51. Part 4, Chapter 57b
52. Conclusion

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Genres

Summary

The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government (1881) is written by Jefferson Davis, former President of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War. Davis wrote the book as a straightforward history of the Confederate States of America and as an apologia for the causes that he believed led to and justified the American Civil War. (Intro modified from Wikipedia) "The most painful pages of this work are those which . . . present the subjugation of the State governments by the Government of the United States. The patriot, the lover of his country and of the liberties of mankind, can not contemplate these facts without a feeling of grief which will not be comforted. That the work of the fathers of the republic, that the most magnificent system of constitutional government which the wisdom of man has devised, should be turned from its object, changed from its order, rendered powerless to protect the unalienable rights and sovereignty of the people, and made the instrument by which to establish and maintain imperialism, is a revolution unlike any other that may be found in the history of mankind. The result established the truthfulness of the assertion . . . that the Northern people, by their unconstitutional warfare to gain the freedom of certain negro slaves, would lose their own liberties." (from chapter 42) This project contains Volume 2 (of 2). Proof-Listened by TriciaG & denisedee