The Arabian Nights Entertainments cover

The Arabian Nights Entertainments

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00:00(1/35) 00 – The Publisher’s Preface00:00
80
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1. 00 – The Publisher’s Preface
2. 01 – The Arabian Nights Entertainments
3. 02 – The Ass, the Ox, and the Labourer
4. 03 – The Merchant and the Genie
5. 04 – The Story of the First Old Man and the Hind
6. 05 – The Story of the Second Old Man and the Two Black Dogs
7. 06 – The Story of the Fisherman
8. 07 – The Story of the Grecian King and the Physician Douban
9. 08 – The Story of the Husband and the Parrot
10. 09 – The Story of the Vizier that was Punished
11. 10 – The History of the Young King of the Black Isles
12. 11 – Story of the Three Calend
13. 12 – The History of the First Calender
14. 13 – The Story of the Second C
15. 14 – The Story of the Envious Man, and of him that he Envied
16. 15 – The History of the Third Calender, part a
17. 16 – The History of the Third Calender, part b
18. 17 – The Story of Zobeide
19. 18 – The Story of Amene
20. 19 – The Story of Sinbad the Voyager
21. 20 – The First Voyage
22. 21 – The Second Voyage
23. 22 – The Third Voyage
24. 23 – The Fourth Voyage
25. 24 – The Fifth Voyage
26. 25 – The Sixth Voyage
27. 26 – The Seventh and Last Voyage
28. 27 – The Three Apples
29. 28 – The Story of the Lady who was Murdered, and of the Young Man her Husband
30. 29 – The Story of Noor ad Deen Ali and Buddir ad Deen Hossun, part a
31. 30 – The Story of Noor ad Deen Ali and Buddir ad Deen Hossun, part b
32. 31 – The Story of Noor ad Deen Ali and Buddir ad Deen Hossun, part c
33. 32 – The History of Ganem, Son of Abou Ayoub, and Known by the Surname of Love’s Slave, part a
34. 33 – The History of Ganem, Son of Abou Ayoub, and Known by the Surname of Love’s Slave, part b
35. 34 – The History of Ganem, Son of Abou Ayoub, and Known by the Surname of Love’s Slave, part c

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Genres

Summary

A collection of folklore stories accumulated during the Islamic Golden Age, The Arabian Nights Entertainments has entertained and fascinated readers for centuries. The book centers on a frame story concerning the sultan Shahrayah and his wife Scheherazade, who cleverly narrates captivating stories to her husband each night in order to save herself from his retribution and live another day. As a result the book encourages the literary technique of a story within a story. The frame story begins when the sultan Shahrayar learns of his brother’s adulterous wife and subsequently discovers his own wife is guilty of infidelity. Overwhelmed by fury, he has his wife executed and in his moment of grief and bitterness declares that all women are the same. Hence begins his pledge to marry a virgin bride each night only to have her executed the next morning in order to prevent the possibility of betrayal. Accordingly, Shahrayar carries out his promise and executes many young women, until there are none left except for the daughters of his trusted vizier, whose responsibility is to provide the virgins. To his dismay and reluctance, his daughter Scheherazade steps in and offers herself as the next bride, however, Scheherazade devises a clever strategy in hopes of putting an end to the sultan’s wrath. On each night she begins to tell a story to the sultan, but does not finish it until the following night, which is then immediately followed by the beginning of another. Therefore, as she weaves one story into the next, she leaves the sultan in a state of curiosity eager to hear each story’s conclusion. Scheherazade tells stories on various topics including love, comedy, burlesque, fantasy, mythology, horror, destiny and many more. Apart from serving as a means of entertainment, The Arabian Nights Entertainments is notable for its didactic purpose, as many of the stories include moral lessons that genuinely stimulate the mind of the reader. Although most distinguished for its stories “Aladdin”, “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves”, and “The Seven Voyages of Sinbad the Sailor”, the book contains many other stories which are appealing to both younger and older readers. Nevertheless, the book has remained a timeless piece of literature which has influenced many cultures and writers, and has been the inspiration for countless film adaptations.

Reviews

TLG

- Book

Good read, chapters 5 and 6 reader has a hard accent to understand