The Anti-Federalist Papers cover

The Anti-Federalist Papers

Patrick Henry (1736-1799)

00:00(1/56) 01 Centinel I00:00
80
x1
1. 01 Centinel I
2. 02 Centinel XI
3. 03 Federal Farmer I
4. 04 Federal Farmer II
5. 05 Federal Farmer III
6. 06 Federal Farmer IV
7. 07 Federal Farmer V
8. 08 Federal Farmer VI
9. 09 Federal Farmer VII
10. 10 Federal Farmer VIII
11. 11 Federal Farmer IX
12. 12 Federal Farmer X
13. 13 Federal Farmer XI
14. 14 Federal Farmer XII
15. 15 Federal Farmer XIII
16. 16 Federal Farmer XIV
17. 17 Federal Farmer XV
18. 18 Federal Farmer XVI
19. 19 Federal Farmer XVII
20. 20 Federal Farmer XVIII
21. 21 Brutus I
22. 22 Brutus II
23. 23 Brutus III
24. 24 Brutus IV
25. 25 Brutus V
26. 26 Brutus VI
27. 27 Brutus VII
28. 28 Brutus VIII
29. 29 Brutus IX
30. 30 Brutus X
31. 31 Brutus XII
32. 32 Brutus XII
33. 33 Brutus XIII
34. 34 Brutus XIV
35. 35 Brutus XV
36. 36 Brutus XVI
37. 37 John DeWitt 1
38. 38 John DeWitt II
39. 39 John Dewitt III
40. 40 Cato III
41. 41 Cato IV
42. 42 Cato V
43. 43 Cato VII
44. 44 Agrippa VI
45. 45 Agrippa VII
46. 46 Agrippa VIII
47. 47 Agrippa IX
48. 48 Penn Minority
49. 49 Impartial Examiner I
50. 50 Impartial Examiner II
51. 51 Impartial Examiner III
52. 52 Maryland Farmer IV
53. 53 Maryland Farmer V
54. 54 Patrick Henry, 5 June 1788
55. 55 Patrick Henry, 7 June 1788
56. 56 Patrick Henry, 9 June 1788

(*) Your listen progress will be continuously saved. Just bookmark and come back to this page and continue where you left off.

Genres

Summary

During the period of debate over the ratification of the Constitution, numerous independent local speeches and articles were published all across the country. Initially, many of the articles in opposition were written under pseudonyms, such as “Brutus”, “Centinel”, and “Federal Farmer”. Eventually, famous revolutionary figures such as Patrick Henry came out publicly against the Constitution. They argued that the strong national government proposed by the Federalists was a threat to the rights of individuals and that the President would become a king. They objected to the federal court system created by the proposed constitution. This produced a phenomenal body of political writing; the best and most influential of these articles and speeches were gathered by historians into a collection known as the Anti-Federalist Papers in allusion to the Federalist Papers.