Le Morte d'Arthur cover

Le Morte d'Arthur

Sir Thomas Malory

1. 01 – Bk 1 Chapters 1-6
2. 02 – Bk 1 Chapters 7-11
3. 03 – Bk 1 Chapters 12-16
4. 04 – Bk 1 Chapters 17-21
5. 05 – Bk 1 Chapters 22-27
6. 06 – Bk 2 Chapters 1-6
7. 07 – Bk 2 Chapters 7-13
8. 08 – Bk 2 Chapters 14-19
9. 09 – Bk 3 Chapters 1-8
10. 10 – Bk 3 Chapters 9-15
11. 11 – Bk 4 Chapters 1 – 7
12. 12 – Bk 4 Chapters 8-13
13. 13 – Bk 4 Chapters 14-18
14. 14 – Bk 4 Chapters 19-22
15. 15 – Bk 4 Chapters 23-28
16. 16 – Bk 5 Chapters 1-5
17. 17 – Bk 5 Chapters 6-9
18. 18 – Bk 5 Chapters 10-12
19. 19 – Bk 6 Chapters 1-6
20. 20 – Bk 6 Chapters 7-10
21. 21 – Bk 6 Chapters 11 – 14
22. 22 – Bk 6 Chapters 15-18
23. 23 – Bk 7 Chapters 1-6
24. 24 – Bk 7 Chapters 7-11
25. 25 – Bk 7 Chapters 12-16
26. 26 – Bk 7 Chapters 17-21
27. 27 – Bk 7 Chapters 22-26
28. 28 – Bk 7 Chapters 27-31
29. 29 – Bk 7 Chapters 32-35
30. 30 – Bk 1 Chapters 1-6
31. 31 – Bk 8 Chapters 7-11
32. 32 – Bk 8 Chapters 12-16
33. 33 – Bk 8 Chapters 17-22
34. 34 – Bk 8 Chapters 23-28
35. 35 – Bk 8 Chapters 29-33
36. 36 – Bk 8 Chapters 34-38
37. 37 – Bk 8 Chapters 39-41
38. 38 – Bk 9 Chapters 01-05
39. 39 – Bk 9 Chapter 06-11
40. 40 – Bk 9 Chapter 12-17
41. 41 – Bk 9 Chapter 18 – 22
42. 42 – Bk 9 Chapters 23-26
43. 43 – Bk 9 Chapters 27-31
44. 44 – Bk 9 Chapters 32-35
45. 45 – Bk 9 Chapters 36-39
46. 46 – Bk 9 Chapters 40-44

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Genres

Summary

Le Morte d’Arthur (spelled Le Morte Darthur in the first printing and also in some modern editions, Middle French for la mort d’Arthur, “the death of Arthur”) is Sir Thomas Malory’s compilation of some French and English Arthurian romances. The book contains some of Malory’s own original material (the Gareth story) and retells the older stories in light of Malory’s own views and interpretations. First published in 1485 by William Caxton, Le Morte d’Arthur is perhaps the best-known work of English-language Arthurian literature today. Many modern Arthurian writers have used Malory as their source, including T. H. White for his popular The Once and Future King.