Anarchism and Other Essays (Version 2) cover

Anarchism and Other Essays (Version 2)

Emma Goldman (1869-1940)

1. Biographic Sketch, pt. 1
2. Biographic Sketch, pt. 2
3. Biographic Sketch, pt. 3
4. Preface by Author
5. Anarchism: What It Really Stands For, pt. 1
6. Anarchism: What It Really Stands For, pt. 2
7. Minorities vs. Majorities
8. The Psychology of Political Violence, pt. 1
9. The Psychology of Political Violence, pt. 2
10. The Psychology of Political Violence, pt. 3
11. Prisons: A Social Crime & Failure, pt. 1
12. Prisons: A Social Crime & Failure, pt. 2
13. Patriotism: A Menace to Liberty, pt. 1
14. Patriotism: A Menace to Liberty, pt. 2
15. Francisco Ferrer & the Modern School, pt. 1
16. Francisco Ferrer & the Modern School, pt. 2
17. The Hypocrisy of Puritanism
18. The Traffic in Women, pt. 1
19. The Traffic in Women, pt. 2
20. Woman Suffrage
21. The Tragedy of Woman's Emancipation
22. Marriage & Love
23. The Modern Drama, pt. 1
24. The Modern Drama, pt. 2

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    Summary

    Emma Goldman, the most famous anarchist in American history, shows the whole range of her iconoclastic thought in this collection of essays. Drawing from a wealth of illustrative material, including the examples of fellow anarchists and radicals of her own acquaintance, modern martyrs, dissident playwrights, poets, and authors, etc., she delineates the main themes of her philosophy with incisiveness and evangelical passion. Included among these themes are: a definition of decentralized anarchism itself; the ambiguous morality of direct action; the curse of modern patriotism; the horrors of early twentieth-century prisons; the need for an entirely new kind of education; the relationship of legal marriage to true love; the insidious danger of Puritanical thought within feminism itself; the deadly spread of sex trafficking; the limitations or even undesirability of woman suffrage; and the extraordinary revolutionary potential of modern theatre. Sadly, none of these themes seem obsolete even to a modern reader; every one of them has direct application to twenty-first century society.