Up the River cover

Up the River

Oliver Optic (1822-1897)

1. 00 – Preface
2. 01 – In Captain Boomsby’s Salon
3. 02 – Four Thousand Dollars
4. 03 – Adieu to the Boomsbys
5. 04 – Nick Boomsby has Aspirations
6. 05 – The Strange Movement of the Islander
7. 06 – A Lively Chase
8. 07 – A Fog off the Florida Coast
9. 08 – A Port in a Storm
10. 09 – A Visit from an Old Acquaintance
11. 10 – Intelligence of the Islander
12. 11 – Difficult Navigation
13. 12 – The Calamity on French Reef
14. 13 – A Night Lost in the Storm
15. 14 – Looking for the Islander
16. 15 – A Partial Solution of the Mystery
17. 16 – Across the Gulf of Mexico
18. 17 – The Sylvania in Ambush
19. 18 – How Nick Boomsby managed his Case
20. 19 – A Search for the Lost Treasure
21. 20 – The Theory and the Facts
22. 21 – Up the Mississippi
23. 22 – The Islander in a Bad Fix
24. 23 – An Embarrassing Situation
25. 24 – A Crevasse on the Mississippi
26. 25 – Sailing Across the Fields
27. 26 – A Desperate Struggle with the Rushing Waters
28. 27 – The Planter and his Family
29. 28 – A Distinguished Passenger
30. 29 – Up the River for many Days
31. 30 – Up another River and Home Again

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Genres

Summary

Up the River is the sixth and last of “The Great Western Series.” The events of the story occur on the coast of Florida, in the Gulf of Mexico, and on the Mississippi River. The volume and the series close with the return of the hero, by a route not often taken by tourists, to his home in Michigan. His voyaging on the ocean, the Great Lakes, and the Father of Waters, is finished for the present; but the writer believes that his principal character has grown wiser and better since he was first introduced to the reader. He has made mistakes of judgment, but whatever of example and inspiration he may impart to the reader will be that of a true and noble boy, with no vices to disfigure his character, and no low aims to lead him from “the straight and narrow path” of duty.Dorchester, Mass., June 1, 1881(Introduction by Author)