Shelley: Selected Poems and Prose cover

Shelley: Selected Poems and Prose

Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822)

1. 01 - Hymn to Intellectual Beauty
2. 02 - Sonnet: Lift not the painted veil
3. 03 - Ode to the West Wind
4. 04 - Excerpt from Preface to Prometheus Unbound
5. 05 - Conclusion of Prometheus Unbound, Act IV, ll. 554-578
6. 06 - The Cloud
7. 07 - Sonnet: England in 1819
8. 08 - Song to the Men of England
9. 09 - A Summer Evening Churchyard, Lechlade, Gloucestershire
10. 10 - Mutability, 2 poems
11. 11 - Lines Written in the Bay of Lerici
12. 12 - Love's Philosophy
13. 13 - Mont Blanc
14. 14 - To Night
15. 15 - Letter to Maria Gisborne
16. 16 - Time Long Past
17. 17 - When the Lamp Is Shattered
18. 18 - Dedication of The Revolt of Islam
19. 19 - With a Guitar, to Jane
20. 20 - To-- One word is too often profaned
21. 21 - Lines Written Among the Euganean Hills
22. 22 - Ozymandias
23. 23 - Stanzas--April, 1814
24. 24 - Feelings of a Republican on the Fall of Bonaparte
25. 25 - On the Medusa of Leonardo da Vinci in the Florentine Gallery
26. 26 - The Indian Serenade
27. 27 - A Dirge
28. 28 - The Sensitive Plant
29. 29 - To Constantia, Singing
30. 30 - A Lament
31. 31 - To a Skylark
32. 32 - The Mask of Anarchy
33. 33 - To Wordsworth
34. 34 - Stanzas Written in Dejection Near Naples
35. 35 - An Exhortation
36. 36 - Excerpts from A Defence of Poetry
37. 37 - To-- When passion's trance is overpast
38. 38 - Ode to Liberty
39. 39 - To-- Music when soft voices die
40. 40 - Dirge for the Year
41. 41 - The Triumph of Life
42. 42 - The World's Wanderers
43. 43 - Hymn of Pan
44. 44 - To-- Oh! there are spirits of the air
45. 45 - Epipsychidion
46. 46 - Rarely, rarely, comest thou
47. 47 - Alastor
48. 48 - The Witch of Atlas
49. 49 - Preface to Adonais
50. 50 - Adonais

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Genres

Summary

The English Romantic Period in literature featured a towering group of excellent poets: Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley and Keats. If we add in forerunners Burns and Blake, we have perhaps an unmatchable collection of writers for any era. Of these, Percy Bysshe Shelley was one of the brightest and best, coupling a giant intellect with a highly emotional and impetuous nature. He was always a champion of liberty, but was largely ignored when he tried to promote political and social reform. He was wise enough, however, to realize that his efforts were ineffective, and he chose instead, not to attempt to reshape society, but to transform the individual, to inspire his readers to a greater love of beauty, of nature, and especially of each other. To this end, he poured forth a profusion of gorgeous verse overflowing with brilliant imagery, all aimed at uplifting the good and the beautiful, the free and the loving, while denouncing the social forces that tended to suppress them.Unfortunately, it was Shelley’s fate to be misunderstood by the people of his own time. He was vilified as an evil influence, a free thinker and free lover whose ideas should be abhorred. He pictured himself in his poetic tribute to Keats, “Adonais,” as an outcast or a martyr, a “phantom among men, companionless,” bearing a brand upon his brow like that of Cain or of Christ. His life was unorthodox, but his nature was highly sympathetic and filled with devotion to those who were ground down by life and the pressures of a callous society. Perhaps the greatest testimonial was paid to him in letters written by Lord Byron (who, incidentally, disagreed with his political ideas): “...he is, to my knowledge, the least selfish and the mildest of men--a man who has made more sacrifices of his fortune and feelings for others than any I ever heard of.” “Shelley...was, without exception, the best and least selfish man I ever knew. I never knew one who was not a beast in comparison.”