Marion Fay cover

Marion Fay

Anthony Trollope (1815-1882)

1. THE MARQUIS OF KINGSBURY.
2. LORD HAMPSTEAD.
3. THE MARCHIONESS.
4. LADY FRANCES.
5. MRS. RODEN.
6. PARADISE ROW.
7. THE POST OFFICE.
8. MR. GREENWOOD.
9. AT KÖNIGSGRAAF.
10. 'NOBLESSE OBLIGE.'
11. LADY PERSIFLAGE.
12. CASTLE HAUTBOY.
13. THE BRAESIDE HARRIERS.
14. COMING HOME FROM HUNTING.
15. MARION FAY AND HER FATHER.
16. THE WALK BACK TO HENDON.
17. LORD HAMPSTEAD'S SCHEME.
18. HOW THEY LIVED AT TRAFFORD PARK.
19. LADY AMALDINA'S LOVER.
20. THE SCHEME IS SUCCESSFUL.
21. WHAT THEY ALL THOUGHT AS THEY WENT HOME.
22. AGAIN AT TRAFFORD.
23. THE IRREPRESSIBLE CROCKER.
24. MRS. RODEN'S ELOQUENCE.
25. MARION'S VIEWS ABOUT MARRIAGE.
26. LORD HAMPSTEAD IS IMPATIENT.
27. THE QUAKER'S ELOQUENCE.
28. MARION'S OBSTINACY.
29. MRS. DEMIJOHN'S PARTY.
30. NEW YEAR'S DAY.
31. MISS DEMIJOHN'S INGENUITY.
32. KING'S COURT, OLD BROAD STREET.
33. MR. GREENWOOD BECOMES AMBITIOUS.
34. LIKE THE POOR CAT I' THE ADAGE.
35. LADY FRANCES SEES HER LOVER.
36. MR. GREENWOOD'S FEELINGS.
37. 'THAT WOULD BE DISAGREEABLE.'
38. 'I DO.'
39. AT GORSE HALL.
40. POOR WALKER.
41. FALSE TIDINGS.
42. NEVER, NEVER, TO COME AGAIN.
43. DI CRINOLA.
44. 'I WILL COME BACK AS I WENT.'
45. TRUE TIDINGS.
46. ALL THE WORLD KNOWS IT.
47. 'IT SHALL BE DONE.'
48. MARION WILL CERTAINLY HAVE HER WAY.
49. 'BUT HE IS;—HE IS.'
50. THE GREAT QUESTION.
51. 'I CANNOT COMPEL HER.'
52. IN PARK LANE.
53. AFTER ALL HE ISN'T.
54. 'OF COURSE THERE WAS A BITTERNESS.'
55. LORD HAMPSTEAD AGAIN WITH MRS. RODEN.
56. LORD HAMPSTEAD AGAIN WITH MARION.
57. CROCKER'S DISTRESS.
58. 'DISMISSAL. B. B.'
59. PEGWELL BAY.
60. LADY AMALDINA'S WEDDING.
61. CROCKER'S TALE.
62. 'MY MARION.'
63. MR. GREENWOOD'S LAST BATTLE.
64. THE REGISTRAR OF STATE RECORDS.

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Genres

    Summary

    Marion Fay (1882) offers a pair of romances, each involving a match between one titled personage and one commoner. The misalliances lead to the typical strains between parental desires and romantic wishes of the young. The novel’s primary characters have such noble dispositions that Trollope was impelled to create several far more interesting minor characters who either threaten mayhem or provide amusing diversions.