Europe and the Faith cover

Europe and the Faith

Hilaire Belloc (1870-1953)

1. Section 01 Introduction
2. Section 02 Introduction (cont.)
3. Section 03 Introduction (concluded)
4. Section 04 Chapter 1
5. Section 05 Chapter 1 (cont)
6. Section 06 Chapter 1 (concluded)
7. Section 07 Chapter 2
8. Section 08 Chapter 2 (cont)
9. Section 09 Chapter 2 (cont)
10. Section 10 Chapter 2 (Concluded)
11. Section 11 Chapter 3
12. Section 12 Chapter 3 (cont.)
13. Section 13 Chapter 3 (cont)
14. Section 14 Chapter 3 (Concluded)
15. Section 15 Chapter 4
16. Section 16 Chapter 4 (cont)
17. Section 17 Chapter 4 (cont.)
18. Section 18 Chapter 4 (concluded)
19. Section 19 Chapter 5
20. Section 20 Chapter 5 (cont.)
21. Section 21 Chapter 5 (cont.)
22. Section 22 Chapter 5 (cont.)
23. Section 23 Chapter 5 (cont.)
24. Section 24 Chapter 5 (cont.)
25. Section 25 Chapter 5 (concluded)
26. Section 26 Chapter 6
27. Section 27 Chapter 6 (cont.)
28. Section 28 Chapter 6 (concluded)
29. Section 29 Chapter 7
30. Section 30 Chapter 7 (concluded)
31. Section 31 Chapter 8
32. Section 32 Chapter 8 (concluded)
33. Section 33 Chapter 9
34. Section 34 Chapter 9 (cont.)
35. Section 35 Chapter 9 (cont.)
36. Section 36 Chapter 9 (concluded)
37. Section 37 Chapter 10
38. Section 38 Chapter 10 (concluded)

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Genres

Summary

The Catholic brings to history (when I say "history" in these pages I mean the history of Christendom) self-knowledge. As a man in the confessional accuses himself of what he knows to be true and what other people cannot judge, so a Catholic, talking of the united European civilization, when he blames it, blames it for motives and for acts which are his own. He himself could have done those things in person. He is not relatively right in his blame, he is absolutely right. As a man can testify to his own motive so can the Catholic testify to unjust, irrelevant, or ignorant conceptions of the European story; for he knows why and how it proceeded. Others, not Catholic, look upon the story of Europe externally as strangers. "They" have to deal with something which presents itself to them partially and disconnectedly, by its phenomena alone: "he" sees it all from its centre in its essence, and together. (Hilaire Belloc)