Crime: Its Cause and Treatment cover

Crime: Its Cause and Treatment

Clarence Darrow (1857-1938)

1. 01 - Preface; Chapter 1: What Is Crime?
2. 02 - Chapter 2: Purpose of Punishment
3. 03 - Chapter 3: Responsibility for Crime
4. 04 - Chapter 4: Environment
5. 05 - Chapter 5: Adjusting Heredity and Environment
6. 06 - Chapter 6: Psychology of Criminal Conduct
7. 07 - Chapter 7: The Criminal
8. 08 - Chapter 8: The Female Criminal
9. 09 - Chapter 9: Juvenile Criminals
10. 10 - Chapter 10: Homicide
11. 11 - Chapter 11: Sex Crimes
12. 12 - Chapter 12: Robbery and Burglary
13. 13 - Chapter 13: Man as a Predatory Animal
14. 14 - Chapter 14: Crimes against Property
15. 15 - Chapter 15: Attitude of the Criminal
16. 16 - Chapter 16: The Law and the Criminal
17. 17 - Chapter 17: Repealing Laws
18. 18 - Chapter 18: Is Crime Increasing?
19. 19 - Chapter 19: Medical Experts
20. 20 - Chapter 20: Punishment
21. 21 - Chapter 21: The Effect of Punishment on Others
22. 22 - Chapter 22: Evolution of Punishment
23. 23 - Chapter 23: Capital Punishment
24. 24 - Chapter 24: Stigmata of the Criminal
25. 25 - Chapter 25: The Good in Criminals
26. 26 - Chapter 26: The Defective and Insane
27. 27 - Chapter 27: Social Control
28. 28 - Chapter 28: Industrialism and Crime
29. 29 - Chapter 29: War and Crime
30. 30 - Chapter 30: Civilizatrion and Crime
31. 31 - Chapter 31: The Convict
32. 32 - Chapter 32: Isolation and Sterilization
33. 33 - Chapter 33: Crime, Disease and Accident
34. 34 - Chapter 34: Luck and Chance
35. 35 - Chapter 35: Pardons and Paroles
36. 36 - Chapter 36: Remedies

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Summary

Clarence Darrow was an American lawyer. He remains notable for his wit and agnosticism, which marked him as one of the most famous American lawyers and civil libertarians.In this book, Darrow expands on his lifelong contention that psychological, physical, and environmental influences—not a conscious choice between right and wrong—control human behavior. To my ears (the reader's), the author has a rather simplistic behaviourist view of human behaviour, but he argues his position with wonderful clarity. Darrow is coherently critical of conspiracy laws, of the creation of laws by the powerful (and consequently the definition of "crime" by that group) .... and his views on the machinery of "justice" and on how criminals are treated are still very relevant.