Belton Estate, The cover

Belton Estate, The

Trollope, Anthony (1815-1882)

1. 01 - Chapter 1
2. 02 - Chapter 2
3. 03 - Chapter 3
4. 04 - Chapter 4
5. 05 - Chapter 5
6. 06 - Chapter 6
7. 07 - Chapter 7
8. 08 - Chapter 8
9. 09 - chapter 9
10. 10 - Chapter 10
11. 11 - Chapter 11
12. 12 - Chapter 12
13. 13 - Chapter 13
14. 14 - Chapter 14
15. 15 - Chapter 15
16. 16 - Chapter 16
17. 17 - Chapter 17
18. 18 - Chapter 18
19. 19 - Chapter 19
20. 20 - Chapter 20
21. 21 - Chapter 21
22. 22 - Chapter 22
23. 23 - Chapter 23
24. 24 - Chapter 24
25. 25 Chapter 25
26. 26 - Chapter 26
27. 27 - Chapter 27
28. 28 - Chapter 28
29. 29 - Chapter 29
30. 30 - Chapter 30
31. 31 - Chapter 31
32. 32 - Chapter 32

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Genres

Summary

Clara Amedroz is the virtuous, intelligent, and quick-witted heroine of this novel. Like all women of her time, she has few options other than to marry. She is lucky enough to have two eligible suitors, and chooses the more urbane and worldly of the two. Alas, however, she realizes fairly quickly that Captain Aylmer is not a nice person. Throughout much of the novel we find her trying hard not to recognize that Will Belton - the suitor she rejected, and who still loves and wants to marry her - is. As in all of Trollope's novels, the sub-plots are at least as engaging as the main story: here, we find Clara associated with, and ultimately for some time dependent on, Mr. and Mrs. Askerton, who - having perforce lived together for some time before they were married - are social outcasts. Clara is courageous enough to remain loyal to these friends, knowing that thus she, too, risks social condemnation and reduces her value on the marital market-place. She becomes wiser, more generous, and more forgiving as her outlook on the world matures in various trials-by fire: the experiences she endures as a result of her mistaken allegiance to Captain Aylmer; her friendship with the Askertons; and the malicious gossip and social ostracization attendant on her loyalty to them. The question that will decide her ultimate happiness is whether she can be as generous and forgiving of herself. (Summary by Kirsten Wever)

Reviews

Frances Hsueh

Kirsten Wever has given a fine reading of the book. Her calm and seemly emotionless tone not only correspond to the heroine's personality but also give the narration a special feeling of suspense.

Interesting to observe old social customs and see the roots of today's culture. Thanks to the reader. I thought the emotions of the words were frequently not reflected in the voice intonation, requiring me to work a little harder to understand. Never-the-less, I appreciate the reader making this available for listening.