At the Point of the Bayonet: A Tale of the Mahratta War cover

At the Point of the Bayonet: A Tale of the Mahratta War

George Alfred Henty (1832-1902)

1. Preface
2. A Faithful Nurse Part 1
3. A Faithful Nurse Part 2
4. A Strange Bringing Up Part 1
5. A Strange Bringing Up Part 2
6. A Change In Affairs Part 1
7. A Change In Affairs Part 2
8. A British Resident Part 1
9. A British Resident Part 2
10. Down To Bombay Part 1
11. Down To Bombay Part 2
12. Down To Bombay Part 3
13. Down To Bombay Part 4
14. In The Company Service Part 1
15. In The Company Service Part 2
16. An Act Of Treachery Part 1
17. An Act Of Treachery Part 2
18. Nana's Release Part 1
19. Nana's Release Part 2
20. A Popular Tumult Part 1
21. A Popular Tumult Part 2
22. A Mission By Sea Part 1
23. A Mission By Sea Part 2
24. A Prisoner Part 1
25. A Prisoner Part 2
26. The Defence Of Johore Part 1
27. The Defence Of Johore Part 2
28. The Break Up Of The Monsoon Part 1
29. The Break Up Of The Monsoon Part 2
30. The Great Andaman Part 1
31. The Great Andaman Part 2
32. Assaye Part 1
33. Assaye Part 2
34. A Disastrous Retreat Part 1
35. A Disastrous Retreat Part 2
36. An Escape Part 1
37. An Escape Part 2
38. An Awkward Position Part 1
39. An Awkward Position Part 2
40. An Awkward Position Part 3
41. Bhurtpoor
42. Home Part 1
43. Home Part 2

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Summary

The story of the war in which the power of the great Mahratta confederacy was broken ended in the firm establishment of the British Empire the Indian Peninsula. When the struggle began, the Mahrattas were masters of no small portion of India; their territory comprising the whole country between Bombay and Delhi, and stretching down from Rajputana to Allahabad; while in the south they were lords of the district of Cuttack, thereby separating Madras from Calcutta. The jealousies of the great Mahratta leaders, Holkar and Scindia, who were constantly at war with each other, or with the Peishwa at Poona, divided and weakened the nation and allowed the British to conquer, although at the cost of much blood, to free a large portion of India from a race that was a scourge--faithless, intriguing and crafty; cruel, and reckless of life. Henty paints the Mahrattas as cowardly tyrants and deserving of their ultimate downfall.