Letters to His Son on the Art of Becoming a Man of the World and a Gentleman cover

Letters to His Son on the Art of Becoming a Man of the World and a Gentleman

Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield

1. 000 - Introduction
2. 001 - Letter
3. 002 - Letters 2-5
4. 003 - Letters 6-7
5. 004 - Letters 8-10
6. 005 - Letters 11-13
7. 006 - Letters 14-15
8. 007 - Letter 16
9. 008 - Letter 17
10. 009 - Letters 18-19
11. 010 - Letters 20-21
12. 011 - Letters 22-23
13. 012 - Letters 24-26
14. 013 - Letters 27-29
15. 014 - Letters 30-31
16. 015 - Letter 32
17. 016 - Letter 33
18. 017 - Letters 34-36
19. 018 - Letter 37
20. 019 - Letters 38-39
21. 020 - Letter 40
22. 021 - Letters 41-42
23. 022 - Letters 43-44
24. 023 - Letter 45
25. 024 - Letter 46
26. 025 - Letters 47-48
27. 026 - Letter 49
28. 027 - Letter 50
29. 028 - Letter 51
30. 029 - Letter 52
31. 030 - Letter 53
32. 031 - Letter 54
33. 032 - Letter 55
34. 033 - Letter 56
35. 034 - Letters 57-59
36. 035 - Letter 60
37. 036 - Letter 61
38. 037 - Letters 62-63
39. 038 - Letter 64
40. 039 - Letters 65-66
41. 040 - Letters 67-68
42. 041 - Letter 69
43. 042 - Letter 70
44. 043 - Letter 71
45. 044 - Letters 72-74
46. 045 - Letter 75
47. 046 - Letter 76-77
48. 047 - Letter 78
49. 048 - Letter 79
50. 049 - Letter 80
51. 050 - Letter 81
52. 051 - Letter 82
53. 052 - Letter 83
54. 053 - Letter 84
55. 054 - Letter 85
56. 055 - Letter 86
57. 056 - Letter 87
58. 057 - Letter 88
59. 058 - Letter 89
60. 059 - Letter 90
61. 060 - Letter 91
62. 061 - Letter 92
63. 062 - Letter 93
64. 063 - Letter 94
65. 064 - Letter 95
66. 065 - Letter 96
67. 066 - Letter 97
68. 067 - Letter 98
69. 068 - Letter 99
70. 069 - Letter 100
71. 070 - Letter 101
72. 071 - Letter 102
73. 072 - Letter 103
74. 073 - Letter 104
75. 074 - Letter 105
76. 075 - Letter 106
77. 076 - Letter 107
78. 077 - Letter 108
79. 078 - Letter 109
80. 079 - Letter 110
81. 080 - Letter 111
82. 081 - Letter 112
83. 082 - Letter 113
84. 083 - Letter 114
85. 084 - Letter 115
86. 085 - Letter 116
87. 086 - Letter 117
88. 087 - Letter 118
89. 088 - Letter 119
90. 089 - Letter 120
91. 090 - Letter 121
92. 091 - Letter 122
93. 092 - Letter 123
94. 093 - Letter 124
95. 094 - Letter 125
96. 095 - Letter 126
97. 096 - Letter 127
98. 097 - Letter 128
99. 098 - Letter 129
100. 099 - Letter 130
101. 100 - Letter 131
102. 101 - Letter 132
103. 102 - Letter 133
104. 103 - Letter 134
105. 104 - Letter 135
106. 105 - Letter 136
107. 106 - Letter 137
108. 107 - Letter 138
109. 108 - Letter 139
110. 109 - Letter 140
111. 110 - Letter 141
112. 111 - Letter 142
113. 112 - Letter 143
114. 113 - Letter 144
115. 114 - Letter 145
116. 115 - Letter 146
117. 116 - Letter 147
118. 117 - Letter 148
119. 118 - Letter 149
120. 119 - Letter 150
121. 120 - Letter 151
122. 121 - Letter 152
123. 122 - Letter 153
124. 123 - Letter 154
125. 124 - Letter 155
126. 125 - Letter 156
127. 126 - Letter 157
128. 127 - Letter 158
129. 128 - Letter 159
130. 129 - Letter 160
131. 130 - Letter 161
132. 131 - Letter 162
133. 132 - Letter 163
134. 133 - Letter 164
135. 134 - Letter 165
136. 135 - Letter 166
137. 136 - Letter 167
138. 137 - Letter 168
139. 138 - Letter 169
140. 139 - Letter 170
141. 140 - Letter 171
142. 141 - Letter 172
143. 142 - Letter 173
144. 143 - Letter 174
145. 144 - Letter 175
146. 145 - Letter 176
147. 146 - Letter 177
148. 147 - Letter 178
149. 148 - Letter 179
150. 149 - Letter 180
151. 150 - Letter 181
152. 151 - Letter 182
153. 152 - Letter 183
154. 153 - Letter 184
155. 154 - Letter 185
156. 155 - Letter 186
157. 156 - Letter 187
158. 157 - Letter 188
159. 158 - Letter 189
160. 159 - Letters 190-191
161. 160 - Letter 192
162. 161 - Letter 193
163. 162 - Letter 194
164. 163 - Letter 195
165. 164 - Letter 196
166. 165 - Letter 197
167. 166 - Letter 198
168. 167 - Letter 199
169. 168 - Letter 200
170. 169 - Letter 201
171. 170 - Letter 202
172. 171 - Letter 203-204
173. 172 - Letter 205-206
174. 173 - Letter 207
175. 174 - Letter 208
176. 175 - Letters 209-210
177. 176 - Letter 211
178. 177 - Letter 212
179. 178 - Letter 213
180. 179 - Letter 214
181. 180 - Letter 215
182. 181 - Letter 216
183. 182 - Letters 217-218
184. 183 - Letters 219-220
185. 184 - Letter 221
186. 185 - Letters 222-223
187. 186 - Letters 224-225
188. 187 - Letters 226-228
189. 188 - Letters 229-231
190. 189 - Letters 232-233
191. 190 - Letters 234-236
192. 191 - Letters 237-238
193. 192 - Letters 239-240
194. 193 - Letters 241-242
195. 194 - Letters 243-244
196. 195 - Letters 245-246
197. 196 - Letters 247-250
198. 197 - Letters 251-253
199. 198 - Letters 254-258
200. 199 - Letters 259-260
201. 200 - Letters 261-263
202. 201 - Letters 264-267
203. 202 - Letters 268-270
204. 203 - Letters 271-272
205. 204 - Letters 273-275
206. 205 - Letters 276-277
207. 206 - Letters 278-280
208. 207 - Letters 281-282
209. 208 - Letters 283-284
210. 209 - Letters 285-286
211. 210 - Letters 287-288
212. 211 - Letters 289-291
213. 212 - Letters 292-293
214. 213 - Letters 294-296
215. 214 - Letters 297-299
216. 215 - Letters 300-302
217. 216 - Letters 303-305
218. 217 - Letters 306-307
219. 218 - Letters 308-310
220. 219 - Letters 311-316
221. 220 - Letters 317-320

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Genres

Summary

Philip Stanhope, Earl of Chesterfield, was at one time Ambassador to the Hague, negotiated the second Treaty of Vienna, was a founding governor of London’s Foundling Hospital, Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland, and Secretary of State. Having no legitimate children, his heir was his third cousin (another Philip) whom he adopted. Although known as a hard, calculating man, he is most well known for his letters to his natural son (i.e., illegitimate son) (also called Philip). When Philip died in 1768, the letters are addressed to his grandchildren (Philip’s two sons, Charles, and, yes, Philip!). (Sibella Denton)From the introduction:“The proud Lord Chesterfield would have turned in his grave had he known that he was to go down to posterity as a teacher and preacher of the gospel of not grace, but—"the graces, the graces, the graces." Natural gifts, social status, open opportunities, and his ambition, all conspired to destine him for high statesmanship. If anything was lacking in his qualifications, he had the pluck and good sense to work hard and persistently until the deficiency was made up. Something remained lacking, and not all his consummate mastery of arts could conceal that conspicuous want,—the want of heart.Teacher and preacher he assuredly is, and long will be, yet no thanks are his due from a posterity of the common people whom he so sublimely despised. His pious mission was not to raise the level of the multitude, but to lift a single individual upon a pedestal so high that his lowly origin should not betray itself. That individual was his, Lord Chesterfield's, illegitimate son, whose inferior blood should be given the true blue hue by concentrating upon him all the externals of aristocratic education.”